Tag: Lady’s Cyclist Guide to Kashgar

The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

Posted February 3, 2013 by jus_de_fruit in Crime, Guest Posts, Historical Fiction / 0 Comments

The Secret Keeper by Kate MortonTitle: The Secret Keeper (Goodreads)
Author: Kate Morton
Published: Allen & Unwin, 2012
Pages: 592
Genres: Crime, Historical Fiction
My Copy: ARC from Publisher

Buy: AmazonBook Depository (or visit your local Indie bookstore)

There are two categories of good books. The ones that introduce you to worlds that absorb you and you never want to leave and you find yourself slowing down towards the end, so you never have to finish the book. The other is the sort of book that compels you through the pages as fast as possible so you can discover the answer to the question that has been left burning inside you throughout that journey.  The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton falls into the latter of those categories.

I started this book at a time when I wasn’t really feeling the need to read anything. Tired and exhausted after work, it felt like too much energy to even pick up a book. I did eventually, and very quickly I was captured by the mystery in this book.

Like A Lady’s Cyclist Guide to Kashgar, this is a book that covers more than one generation and the stories that link them together. Once again, I am left pondering the lives of my parents and grandparents and how the decisions they made may be influencing me now without me even realizing it. I wonder about the adventures of my own mum before she became a mother, because as her child it’s difficult to imagine her even existing without me as her daughter.

The Secret Keeper tells the story of Laurel Nicolson, who at 16 witnesses her mother commit a violent crime, which is barely spoken of again. As her mother approaches the end of her life fifty year later, suffering with dementia, Laurel realizes this is her last chance to find out the truth of that moment. The story flips between Laurel’s own investigations as well the story as lived by her mother during the war in the 1940s. Slowly, the characters fall into place, the connections become clear and a beautiful story is weaved.

I did predict how it would end before it got there, but I was still filled with uncertainty as to whether I was correct. The story could have taken any number of turns and I raced through the pages to find what the truth of the situation actually was. Kate Morton has done an amazing job with this story and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys mystery, romance and historical fiction.

This is a guest post by Mary; not only is she my wonderful wife, she is also my editor and helps moderate the Literary Exploration group on Goodreads. Big thanks to her for this post and everything she does to help me with this blog.